Summary: Women who experienced physical, sexual, or financial abuse had worse menopausal symptoms and worse well-being two decades later.

Source: at home

The physical and mental damage continues years after the stresses of a woman’s early life are removed.

A new study suggests that a history of psychosocial stressors (physical or sexual abuse or financial instability) can lead to worse menopausal symptoms and poorer well-being nearly 2 decades later.

The study results were published online today Menopause.

Menopause is often accompanied by a number of symptoms that negatively impact a woman’s quality of life; These include hot flashes, sleep disturbances, anxiety symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. However, not all women experience menopause the same, with some women having more severe problems.

There are many reasons for the differences. In this new study of nearly 700 women, researchers sought to link a history of psychological distress during pregnancy from childhood to worse menopausal symptoms.

Although previous studies have attempted to show the long-term negative effects of various types of abuse, most of them have been small or focused more on the current abuse.

This study focused specifically on the history of stress reported during pregnancy and its association with women’s health in midlife 15 to 20 years later.

In this study group, a history of physical abuse was reported by 37.3% of participants, which resulted in worse menopausal symptoms and worse general health, as well as higher depressive symptoms.

Another 7.7% reported a history of sexual violence, which was associated with worse symptoms during the menopause transition, as well as worse overall health. However, there was no documented association with depressive symptoms.

This shows a woman sitting on a swing
Menopause is often accompanied by a number of symptoms that negatively impact a woman’s quality of life; These include hot flashes, sleep disturbances, anxiety symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. The image is in the public domain.

A history of financial instability was associated with worse menopausal symptoms, overall health status, and greater depressive symptoms.

There was no relationship between psychosocial stressors and general depressive symptoms assessed at midlife.

Based on the results of the study, the researchers concluded that psychosocial stress after the first report was associated with worse menopausal symptoms and well-being.

These results highlight the long-term impact of adverse experiences on women’s physical and mental health and the importance of past histories of psychosocial stressors in considering women’s health in midlife.

Study results are published in the title “Longitudinal Associations of Psychosocial Stress with Menopausal Symptoms and Well-Being among Middle-Aged Women.”

“This study provides further evidence to support the association between problems occurring earlier in life, worse menopausal symptoms and poorer well-being in middle-aged women.

“More research is needed to better understand the effects of long-term and repeated stress on the health of middle-aged women,” said Dr. Stephanie Fabion, medical director of NAMS.

watch out

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So abuse and menopause research news

Author: Mary Nancy
Source: at home
Contact: Mary Nance – NAMS
Image: The image is in the public domain.

Preliminary study: Closed access.
Longitudinal associations of psychosocial stressors with menopausal symptoms and well-being among middle-aged women” in Faleschini, Sabrina et al. Menopause


Draft

Longitudinal associations of psychosocial stressors with menopausal symptoms and well-being among middle-aged women

Purpose

We examined longitudinal associations of psychosocial stressors with menopausal symptoms and well-being in midlife women in a longitudinal cohort.

Methods

This study is based on 682 women from Project Viva. It will be a cohort enrolled from 1999 to 2002 during pregnancy (median age = 33.3 y) and followed for almost two decades. During pregnancy, women self-reported psychosocial stress (history of physical and sexual violence and financial instability, from childhood to current pregnancy). In the year They reported their menstrual symptoms (0-44 point scale) and well-being (general health) from 2017 to 2021 (median age, 51.6 years). [good/fair/poor vs excellent/very good]General anxiety symptoms and depression symptoms [both—more than minimal levels vs none/minimal]). We performed multivariate and logistic regression models, adjusting for covariates, to examine associations of psychosocial stressors with outcomes.

Results

A history of physical abuse (reported by 37.3) was associated with worse menopausal symptoms in somatovegetative (odds ratio) [OR], 0.46 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04–0.87 points) and psychological (OR, 0.52 points; 95% CI, 0.07–0.97 points) domains and worse general health (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.17–2.55) and more depressive symptoms (OR, 1.74 ). ; 95% CI, 1.05–2.87). A history of sexual abuse (7.7%) was associated with worse menopausal symptoms (OR, 2.81 points; 95% CI, 1.05-4.56) and worse general health (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.04-4.03), but was not associated with depressive symptoms. . A history of financial instability (10.8%) was associated with worse menopausal symptoms (1.92 points; 0.49 to 3.34), worse general health (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.24-3.75) and higher depressive symptoms (OR, 2.68; 95). % CI, 1.44–4.98). We observed no association between psychosocial stressors assessed at midlife and total depressive symptoms.

Conclusions

Psychosocial stressors have been associated with menopausal symptoms and well-being decades after the first report.

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