Summary: 11% and 16% of those who exercise early in the morning and early in the morning, respectively, have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. People who exercised in the morning were 17% less likely to have a stroke than those in the control group.

Source: European Society of Cardiology

Morning exercise is associated with a lower risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a study of more than 85,000 individuals published today. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

The findings were consistent regardless of total daily activity.

“Exercise is well-established for heart health, and our research now suggests that morning activity seems to be the most beneficial,” said Gali Albalak of the Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands. The findings are particularly striking in females and apply to both early birds and night owls.

The study used data from the UK Biobank. It included 86,657 adults aged 42 to 78 years with baseline cardiovascular disease. The average age was 62 years and 58% were women. Participants wore an activity tracker on their wrist for seven consecutive days. Participants were followed for cardiovascular disease, which was defined as first hospitalization or death related to coronary artery disease or stroke.

During the six- to eight-year follow-up, 2,911 participants had coronary heart disease and 796 had a stroke. Comparing peak working hours in a 24-hour period, being most active between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. was associated with the lowest risks of heart disease and stroke.

In the second analysis, the investigators divided the participants into four groups based on the peak time of exercise: 1) midday; 2) in the morning (~8 am); 3) early morning (~10 am); and 4) evening (~7 pm).

The categories were chosen based on the peak activity time in the study population rather than being predetermined before the start of the study. The associations between the peak time of the activity and the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases were analyzed in the middle of the day as a reference group.

After adjustment for age and sex, participants who were most active in the morning or early morning had an 11% and 16% lower risk of coronary artery disease, respectively, compared with the reference group. In addition, those who were most active in the morning were reduced by 17 percent compared to the reference group.

This shows an old woman riding a bicycle.
In addition, those who were most active in the morning were reduced by 17 percent compared to the reference group. The image is in the public domain.

The findings were consistent regardless of overall daily activity, and whether participants described themselves as a morning person or a night person. When the results were analyzed separately by gender, the researchers found that the effects were particularly pronounced for women but not for men.

Women who were most active in the morning or early morning had a 22% and 24% lower risk of coronary artery disease compared to the reference group. In addition, women who were most active in the morning had a 35 percent lower risk of incident stroke compared to the reference group.

“This was an observational study, so we can’t say why the associations were more marked in women,” Ms Albalak said. Our findings add further evidence to the health benefits of physical activity, suggesting that morning activity, particularly early in the morning, may be most beneficial.

“As this is a very new area of ​​research, it’s too early for a standard recommendation to prioritize morning exercise. But we hope that one day we can improve current recommendations by simply adding a line that says, ‘When you exercise in the morning, it’s recommended that you exercise in the morning.’

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Author: Press office
Source: European Society of Cardiology
Contact: Press Office – European Society of Cardiology
Image: The image is in the public domain.

Preliminary study: Open Access.
Setting your clock: associations between physical activity duration and risk of cardiovascular disease in the general populationBy Gali Albalak et al. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology


Draft

Setting your clock: associations between physical activity duration and risk of cardiovascular disease in the general population

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Objectives

Little is known about the effect of daily physical activity duration (referred to here as ‘chronoactivity’) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We aimed to examine associations between time movement and multiple CVD outcomes in the UK Biobank.

Methods and results

Physical activity data were collected by UK-Biobank with a triaxial accelerometer during a 7-day measurement period. We used K-means clustering to create clusters of participants with similar time activity regardless of average daily intensity of exercise.

Multivariable-adjusted Cox-proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for age and sex in different cohorts (model 1) and baseline cardiovascular risk factors (model 2). Additional detailed analyzes were performed by gender, average activity level, and self-reported sleep chronotype. We included 86 657 individuals (58% female, mean age: 61.6). [SD: 7.8] years, average BMI: 26.6 [4.5] kg / m2). During the 6-year follow-up period, 3707 CVD events were reported.

Overall, participants who tended to exercise in the morning had a lower risk of coronary artery disease (HR: 0.84, 95%CI: 0.77, 0.92) and stroke (HR: 0.83, 95%CI: 0.70, 0.98) than participants who exercised in the afternoon. . These effects were more pronounced in women (Pfor correlation value = 0.001). We found no evidence to support effect modification by total activity level and sleep chronotype.

Summary

Regardless of total physical activity, morning exercise was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, demonstrating the importance of chronoactivity in CVD prevention.

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